High-speed Ground Transportation System

The high-speed rail ground transportation system (HSGT) is a concept developed to meet the challenges of the increasing demands of passenger transportation and recover their share of traffic from road and other modes of transport. The details

and developments of the high-speed rail system are presented in Tables 32.1 and 32.2, respectively.

Table 32.1 Details of the high-speed rail system

Speed range (km/h)

Details

200-250

>

Diesel electric trains (including the British HST)

>

Electrified tilt-body trains (including the Swedish X2000, the Italian Pendolino, the Spanish Talgo)

>

Electrified non-tilting the rains (including the US Metroliner)

250-350

>

Electrified non-tilting trains (including the Japanese Shinkansen, the French TGV, the German ICE)

Above 350

>

Maglev systems developed in Japan and Germany. These are a combination of superconducting magnets and linear motor technology and have a non-adhesive drive system that is independent of wheel and rail frictional forces

Table 32.2 Development of the high-speed rail system

Year

Country

Details

1964

Japan

Tokyo-Osaka, covers 515 km in 3 hrs 10 m (Shinkansen network expansion)

1981-83

France

Paris-Lyon, covers 410 km in 2 hrs (TGV network)

1991

Germany

ICE trains in Germany (Hanover-Wurzberg, covers 327 km in 2 hrs.)

1992

Spain

Madrid-Seville, covers 471 km in 2 hrs 15 m (AVE and Talgo trains)

1994

Eurostar in the UK, France, and Belgium

1995-2003

Finland, Italy, Sweden, USA, Australia, China, Switzerland, South Korea, and other countries

In the year 2000-01, HSGT operations stretched over a distance of around 4900 km across the world and work on another 680 km was in progress or in the planning stages in various countries.

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